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What Remains is the story of Montevecchio, a small mining village in the South West of Sardinia.  My Grandfather Augusto Pia was employed here for a good part of his life as a Blacksmith. I, on the other hand, grew up in Cagliari, Sardinia’s largest city, about sixty
kilometres from Guspini, the village where my maternal Grandparents lived.

Growing up, my siblings and I would visit my grandparents every weekend, and that meant going to the mines, located some five Kilometres from the village. As kids we used to go there for long stretches during the summer holidays. We’d walk from the village to the mines and explore, risking our lives god knows how many times without even realising it.

I don’t remember anyone ever working there although the mines officially closed in 1991 when I was 18.
They were probably still open but only on paper. I have no memories of activities, workers, or miners, as far as I remember they always seemed closed and abandoned. We knew all the best ways to get in and once inside would find ourselves surrounded by gigantic machines and infinite spaces. One of our favourite games was dropping rocks down the mine shafts, to see if we could hear them hit the bottom but we never could, they were too deep. We were kicked out hundreds of times, but we kept going back, every time more determined and more adventurous than the last…